Sunday, 16 April 2017

Shetland Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes zetlandicus)



It is only few seconds long video, but that was all I managed to snatch of the Shetland Wren after chasing them for 3 months. Its not that they are particularly uncommon, but they move a lot and normally while I'm getting my camera out they are gone and I feel really unlucky with them.

So the Shetland Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes zetlandicus) is not a separated species of wren, but rather endemite subspecies living on the Shetland Islands. There is also another subspecies living on the Fair Isle, but I didn't had to go there and missed the opportunity to see it. And as the Wikipedia says the differences from the more common T. t. troglodytes are its darker and more rufous-brown colouring, with a heavily barred underside, the barring extending from belly to breast and the bill is stouter and longer and it has stronger legs. An estimate of the population, from the start of the 21st century, was of 1500–3000 breeding pairs.

Shetland Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes zetlandicus
Shetland Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes zetlandicus
Shetland Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes zetlandicus
Shetland Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes zetlandicus
Shetland Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes zetlandicus
Shetland Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes zetlandicus

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